How to Store Your Batteries in Self Storage

Jon Fesmire |

Whether you store your batteries at home or in self storage, it’s important to do so in a way that keeps them in good condition.

Why would you keep them in self storage? If you run a small business that sells toys or other electronics that need batteries, or a brick-and-mortar store and you need a place to keep your stock, including batteries, then self storage is a good option.

Here are the basic steps for storing standard batteries.

Keep Them in The Original Packaging

When you purchase batteries, don’t open the packaging until you’re ready to use some. And even after, it’s best to keep the unused batteries in the original packaging.

Not all battery packaging is equal, though. It should keep them protected from humidity and elements. If you’re not sure the packaging is doing that, there are alternatives. Get boxes the right size to hold a bunch of batteries of the same make and age. You don’t want to mix these. Do not store them in a metal box. Instead, opt for plastic, wood, or glass. Plastic food containers, which you can purchase at a supermarket or dollar store, work well. They’ll help keep out humidity and allow you to put like batteries together.

When you buy new batteries and transfer them to safe boxes, label the new packaging with the purchase date. That way you’ll never mix new and old batteries.

Why shouldn’t you store different makes of batteries together? In proximity, they can short circuit. This is also true if you store them in metal containers.

Store in the Right Conditions

Store your batteries in a cool, dry place, but not freezing. Room temperature to around 50 degrees is good, with 60 degrees being the ideal temperature.

To achieve this at home, we recommend storing your batteries in a cool closet. In self storage, get a unit with climate control. Facilities keep the temperature of these units between 50 and 80 degrees, and sometimes in a tighter range, and the humidity between 30% and 50%.

Don’t Freeze Your Batteries

Some people keep their batteries in the refrigerator, and this can work. However, despite the cold in a refrigerator, the humidity can be too high, which can cause condensation. That can lead to corrosion and power leakage. If you want to store them in a refrigerator, store them in a vapor-proof container. When you retrieve them, let them acclimate to room temperature for 24 hours.

Do not store batteries in the freezer, however, unless the manufacturer says you can, or that this is the proper way to store their batteries. In that case, follow their instructions.

If you decide to use self storage, check our listings, which cover the U.S. and Canada, and look for a facility with climate control.